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Downloadable PDF - 2017 EWWD - Field Test Report

 

2017 List of Certified Backflow Testers

 

 

SO, WHAT’S ALL THE FUSS ABOUT
“BACKFLOW  AND CROSS-CONNECTION CONTROL?”

As defined in Washington Administrative Code 246-290-490, a backflow is “the flow of water or other liquids, gases or solids from any source
back into the customer’s plumbing system or the water purveyor’s (East Wenatchee Water District) water distribution system."

It is our job and commitment to keep your water safe. It is our responsibility to prevent backflow conditions as a means of keeping your water safe.
We do this by enforcing our Cross-Connection Control Program which is outlined in East Wenatchee Water District Resolution No. 462, and is available to you at our office.

In short, our Cross-Connection Control Program is a plan of action for us to eliminate the potential of dangerous backflow occurrences.
We accomplish this by performing plan reviews on proposed building projects, sight inspections on all newly installed backflow assemblies, 
requiring annual testing of all assemblies and by educating you, the one who would be affected most, about the dangers of cross-connections and backflow.

An auxiliary water source is any water that does not originate from the East Wenatchee Water District’s system.
The following are examples of auxiliary water: ditch water, unapproved wells, ponds or sumps.
These sources are used for irrigation purposes and are not approved for human consumption.

Occasionally, customers that use auxiliary water for irrigation want to access the District’s water when their auxiliary source is not available.
They achieve this by placing a valve or section of pipe between their auxiliary source and the District’s potable water.
*THIS IS NOT ALLOWED UNLESS A REDUCED PRESSURE BACKFLOW ASSEMBLY IS INSTALLED immediately
downstream of the water meter to protect the public water system from potential contamination.

This is an unauthorized cross-connection and without adequate backflow protection it poses a
high health hazard, not only to the direct customer, but to the entire public water system.

 

THERE ARE SEVERAL WAYS AUXILIARY WATER
CAN CONTAMINATE THE DRINKING WATER:

Irrigation pumps may create a higher pressure than we supply and cause contaminated water to be back-pressured into the public water system.

A main break can cause a drop in system pressure and back-siphon water into the public water system.

High water demand such as firefighting situations can cause system pressure to drop and water to be back-siphoned into the public water system.

If there is a direct cross-connection between the public water system and a contaminated source and adequate
backflow protection is not in place, in any of the above situations, serious health issues could result.